Autism Month

Note from Me: There has been a long gap in the posts to this blog. My apologies. I’m working on a second book, fiction this time, so I think my brain and daily clock only allow me a certain word count. But since it is Autism Month I felt compelled to share some thoughts.

I’ve spent the last few weeks gearing up for Autism month-which started yesterday (and today is Light it Up Blue – World Autism Day- so hope you put out your blue light bulbs). I’ve been reaching out to my community, schools, libraries, etc., to talk about Autism. It’s something I am passionate about as many of you know, as my son is on the spectrum. If you didn’t know, scroll down farther on the blog and read snippets from the book I wrote about our journey. Or you can order it on Amazon (The e-book is on sale now for World Autism Day). Purchase on Amazon

A few weeks ago I was invited to a Facebook group of “Autism Ambassadors”, who are also reaching out to their communities. I was asked for a quote for an article about Autism Acceptance and it got me thinking more about Autism Awareness month and how it relates to Autism Acceptance. (See link a the bottom for that article) I think we all can agree, the awareness part is sort of ‘been there, done that’. Twelve years ago when my son was diagnosed that wasn’t the case. For those who read my book, I talk about a store employee that didn’t understand what I was saying when I explained my son was autistic, after he had the mother of all tantrums. Her reaction was “Oh, how great”. Clearly she didn’t comprehend the complete melt down my entire life was at that moment, nor what Autism meant. Since then, I think most people are pretty aware of autism.

But, it’s not the aware part I’m focusing on anymore. Acceptance is what I’m after. And it’s seems to be a common theme in the Autism world today. Acceptance comes from knowledge and I plan to teach anywhere I can, starting here.

I’m going to give you some homework today: Go to Google and type ‘Autism Acceptance’ and choose just one of the many links. If you have someone with autism in your life, your story could be much different than those you read about and can broaden your perception. If you work with people on the spectrum, it will hopefully demonstrate how different each child is. Or if you have no one in your life, I guarantee you will learn something.

Then if you will, take any insight you have gained, put it out in the world, in your own way: share an article you read; put a quote on social media; talk with a typically developing child who may not understand it yet-they are going to be the best ambassadors for change. Change can happen but it starts with you. If you can broaden your mind, you can most certainly help to broaden others just by talking about something heard about, but not quite understood.

I thank you for attempting this homework. And if you don’t have time to get on the Google, just click the link below, you will learn quite about from this article. More to come…

 

Article for Autism Acceptance (Yes, my name is spelled wrong, actually it’s only part of my name, so just get over it-I had to.)

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One Response to Autism Month

  1. Catherine Land

    Love this blog, LeeAndra – for so many reasons. There is a big difference between awareness and acceptance… It should be Autism Acceptance Month and with ambassadors like you and your family, I know it will soon be. Great quote in the article too.

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